What love does.

What love does.

Love covers a multitude of sins.  1) 1 Peter 4:8, ESV. Written by the Apostle Peter as ascribed in the epistle’s introduction. It was likely written circa 62-64 A.D. before Peter lost his life to Roman persecution. See Wayne A. Grudem’s 1 Peter Commentary on a further discussion of authorship.

Political ones.
Relational ones.
Ones you condemn others for and do yourself.
Small ones.
Big ones.

Love. It is a desire. It is a state. It is a feeling. It is a action. More than these it is a commitment. It is a commitment to choose over and over and over again someone or something to pour our energy and direction in to with our lives and energy. Love is not merely conceptual but connectional.

Covers. Darkness begins to fade as light envelopes and transforms one version of reality for another. This is what it means to cover. To cover something changes it from one state to another. Before we dress we are naked. When we dress we are covered and interact with reality in a different manner than before we were dressed. What covers us makes a difference to how we interact with reality.

a multitude.  The Greek word for multitude means a great number. It is the word that we get our word plethora from and it means a whole lot of something.

of sins. Not of mistakes. Not of simple slights. Not of mulligans. Sin is when we transgress. It always involves God and usually involves other people. Our sins are not simple mistakes but huge affronts to God. Sin is such a problem that when the first people sinned, God chose to curse the first sinners with a punishment that brought death in to humanity. Sin is the major issue that though not really thought of in our social acceptance culture is the central problem of humanity.

As bad as sin is though, it is not greater than love. After God cursed sin, he promised redemption. God’s method of redemption is love.

Love covers a multitude of sins. 

When we hear the words that love covers a multitude of sins we must not reduce it to some easily offered memory verse. It is not a pat answer to the struggles of human life. It is a revolutionary line that began to transform the world soon after Peter first penned those words to the fledgling church that was scatted across the Roman empire.

Peter wanted his audience to know that God has a solution to sin. It is the love of Jesus. It is a love that covers, envelopes, consumes what it touches. Love is like the downpour of a powerful rain when it hits a dry street. It covers it and transforms everything it touches from dry to drenched. It does not just touch sin but destroys it. Love is not merely the bleach that takes away the stains of sin. It is the water that washes away the stain and leaves the garment better than new. It gives us a reason to sing a new song of joy. Our sins are washed away.

The early Christians knew the power of love. Instead of fighting back against their oppressors they chose to love their nemeses and enemies. They figuratively and literally died for their audacious love. Their love changed their world. This type of love can change ours. It begins when are willing to let God’s love extend from us and begin to love the unlovely. We have to love real sinners.

Political ones.
Relational ones.
Ones you condemn others for even as we sin like them.
Small ones.
Big ones.

Go love someone. Particularly, the folks that sin in ways that you especially do not like. Do it because of Jesus and remember that love covers a multitude of sins.

References   [ + ]

1. 1 Peter 4:8, ESV. Written by the Apostle Peter as ascribed in the epistle’s introduction. It was likely written circa 62-64 A.D. before Peter lost his life to Roman persecution. See Wayne A. Grudem’s 1 Peter Commentary on a further discussion of authorship.

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